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The Sagadahoc Colony

By Henry O. Thayer, (Portland, Maine, 1892)

Order item B873

The book's full text (294 pages) has been converted to PDF format which is searchable using the Acrobat Reader software program's "FIND" function. And, the book is fully indexed.  Priced at $14.95 plus $3.99 shipping & handling charge. Add $1.00 S&H for each additional item ordered.

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     This book presents a detailed accounting of the Sagadahoc Colony (also known as The Popham Colony). The Popham Colony was a short-lived English colonial settlement in North America that was founded in 1607 and located in the present-day town of Phippsburg, Maine near the mouth of the Kennebec River by the proprietary Virginia Company of Plymouth.  It was founded a few months later in the same year as its more successful rival, the Jamestown Settlement, which was established on June 14, 1607 by the Virginia Company of London in present-day James City County, Virginia, as the first permanent English settlement in the present United States.  Five years after the settlement attempt at Cuttyhunk in what is now Massachusetts, the Popham Colony was the second English colony in the region that would eventually become known as New England.  The colony was abandoned after only one year, apparently more due to family changes in the leadership ranks than lack of success in the New World.  The loss of life of the colonists in 1607 and 1608 at Popham was far lower than the experience at Jamestown.

     The first ship built by the English in the New World was completed during the year of the Popham Colony and was sailed back across the Atlantic Ocean to England.  The pinnace, named Virginia of Sagadahoc, was apparently quite seaworthy, and crossed the Atlantic again successfully in 1609 as part of Sir Christopher Newport's nine-vessel Third Supply mission to Jamestown. The tiny Virginia survived a massive three day storm en route which was thought to have been a hurricane and which wrecked the mission's large new flagship Sea Venture on Bermuda.

     The exact site of the Popham Colony was lost until its rediscovery in 1994. Much of this historical location is now part of Maine's Popham Beach State Park.

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